2015 Reader Survey Results

Originally posted on A Writer of History:

2015 What countryThe 2015 reader survey ran from April 23 to May 19 and reached 2033 participants from different parts of the world.

2015 Historical Fiction Reader Survey report summarizes results shedding light on preferences and habits of readers, particularly in the realm of historical fiction. The report includes unique questions for authors, bloggers and publishing industry professionals as well as a series of questions regarding social reading. Click here to access the full 24-page report.

Stay tuned for further insights regarding favourite authors — more than 3600 entries to collate — and favourite historical fiction — more than 4000 entries to collate — as well as deeper analysis from cross-tabulation of results.

Best way to ‘stay tuned’ is to follow A Writer of History (see the FOLLOW button on the left hand margin).

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April CampNanoWriMo

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Writing Sites :: Figment

Recently, I’ve been looking at online writing communities and what they have to offer. I’ve been a member of a few sites in the past, but as the years go by, new sites replace old ones. I’ll be making the rounds to take a look at what the internet writing community has to offer! For the time being, I’ve visited two of the larger writing communities out there: Scribophile and Figment. I’ve reviewed the simpler of the two here.


figmentlogo Figment began back in 2010 and has grown exponentially to over 300,000 users. They merged with Inkpop (Harper Collin’s teen writing site) in 2012, and in 2013, Random House Children’s Group acquired Figment.

Like Inkpop, Figment is mainly geared towards teens (13+ only). Its site layout is easy on the eyes and very simple to follow. All genres are included, including fanfiction. Their most popular tags are love, romance, poetry, fantasy, and drama. You can achieve quite a few badges for your profile page based on your publishing, commenting, reviewing, or reading stats.

When reading a story, you have several options: you can click on one of several “silent” reactions (sad, blush, laugh, etc.), you can “heart” it, and you can either leave a comment or a review/critique. I’ve noticed reviewers and commenters both tend to generally leave positive feedback. Reviews are for the story as a whole, rather than by chapter.

There is no copy/paste function on the site, so writers need not worry too much about others stealing their work.

Periodic chats (Q&A) with authors, user-created groups, and writing contests graded by authors immerse Figs with improving their writing, as well as socializing with like-minded writers. They also offer an optional weekly newsletter (you can subscribe without signing up for Figment) that provides community news and a spotlight on a Fig writer.

If YA and/or romance (excluding erotica) is your genre, Figment would be a great place to read and display your work. Figment is a very positive community.


Check-In

How many arms and legs do I need to hand over to get approved for a house?

Quite a lot with some to spare, it seems. If all goes well, I will be one happy camper. My to-do lists are going off the pages. When a couple items are checked off, ten more appear on it. I’m feeling absolutely frazzled and I’ve been running around like a chicken with its head cut off. It’ll be our first home, and I know the approval is only half the stress. I’m not looking forward to the other half either. Just the finished product. But it sure does feel good to check things off lists, I highly recommend it.

Due to the recent real-life happenings, I haven’t written much in Parallax. I wrote three chapters at around 6k words so far. I was shooting for 10k for this month and I still may be able to make that figure, but I’m not hopeful. I had decided to participate in April’s CampNano a couple weeks ago for 30k words, but that was prior to real-life endeavors.

It’s finding the time to write (I take a while to settle in) that’s a struggle. Parallax is a new approach for me: I used the Snowflake method and have over ten pages worth of an outline. The beginning chapters of the MC has already been altered, but that’s a good thing because the original opening was weak, and I glad I found an alternative. Alterations and additions and subtractions are anticipated and welcome.

In my first finished novel, I implemented a different format: I made a basic checklist of things that needed to happen in the next chapter or two, and that’s how I eventually made it to the end of the book. It worked for that novel, but it wouldn’t have worked for Parallax because of the amount of characters, subplots, backstory and foreshadowing that needs to happen here in this so-called epic fantasy I’m writing. I have to say I feel much more organized using an outline, and in leaving it open to alterations, the outline hasn’t taken out all the spark of writing it.

So for April CampNano, I’ll see what I can do. I’m feeling pessimistic about it.

I just dug up an old fanfiction story (FFIX), and I hate to say it but I’m feeling drawn toward it. I really don’t want to put Parallax on the backburner again for the umpteenth time. I haven’t finished the fanfiction, heaven knows where I was going with it, and it certainly needs a total rewrite, but I do so love Final Fantasy IX. I’m hoping this is just a momentary lapse in interest.

As mentioned before, my real life and writing life is kind of crazy. I’m debating putting up some of my writing here but I really sort of meant this blog to be about the art of writing and book reviews, not a personal blog. It’s up for debate as of now. So for now, I’ll keep my personal life to a minimum.